Baltimore American Indian Center

Native American Education

Title VII Indian Education Baltimore City Public Schools

 

The mission of the federal Office of Indian Education is to support the efforts of local educational agencies, Indian tribes and organizations, postsecondary institutions, and other entities to meet the unique educational and culturally related academic needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives so that these students can achieve to the same challenging state standards as all students.

 

The No Child Left Behind Act amends the Indian education programs as Title VII, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. This landmark in education reform embodies four key principles: stronger accountability for results; greater flexibility in the use of federal funds; more choices for parents of children from disadvantaged backgrounds; and an emphasis on research-based instruction that works.

 

The Title VII Indian Education Program of Baltimore City Public Schools (BCPS) serves American Indian and Alaskan Native students who are currently enrolled in BCPS and who have submitted a federal Title VII Student Eligibility Certification (506) form. Per the 506 form: “Definition: Indian means any individual who is (1) a member (as defined by the Indian tribe or band) of an Indian tribe or band, including those Indian tribe or bands terminated since 1940, and those recognized by the State in which the tribe or band reside; or (2) a descendent in the first or second degree (parent or grandparent) as described in (1); or (3) considered by the Secretary of the Interior to be an Indian for any purpose; or (4) an Eskimo or Aleut or other Alaska Native; or (5) a member of an organized Indian group that received a grant under the Indian Education Act of 1988 as it was in effect October 19, 1994.”

 

Our students attend a wide range of Baltimore City Public Schools, the majority of which are in Southeast. The Title VII Indian Education Program of Baltimore City Public Schools has existed since 1973 to meet the unique educational and culturally related academic needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives so that these students can achieve to the same challenging state standards as all students.

 

Our program provides the following services:

Culturally-responsive Academic Support (tutoring)

Culturally-responsive Academic Enrichment (after-school programming at and in partnership with the Baltimore American Indian Center)

School Supplies

Access to emergency food

Information to increase awareness and appreciation of American Indian culture and history

Cultural presentations

Preparation to promote students to become economically independent

Measures to increase parent involvement    

Home visits      

Regular contact with students, teachers, and administrators    

Mediation      

College preparation

Assistance with scholarships

Annual Graduation Ceremony in partnership with the Baltimore American Indian Center and the Maryland Commission on Indian Affairs

Established relationships to other local Native community entities and resources such as: The Baltimore American Indian Center, The Maryland Commission on Indian Affairs, The Native American After School Art Program (NAASAP) and Council of the Three Rivers American Indian Center (COTRAIC)

Access to three volunteer Foster Grandparents who are tribal elders through our relationship with Family and Children’s Services of Central Maryland Foster Grandparent Program